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kelsium:

I don’t think I know anyone with this background, but maybe we can signal boost. One major thing the Ferguson organizers have been asking for specifically for several days is for service donations from mental health professionals with a background in trauma counseling, people of color would be preferable for obvious reasons. If you know someone who might be willing to either to go to Ferguson or do tele-sessions, please direct them to this form.

khromejio:

lovelyandbrown:

alternaterealitygame:

Everyone please send your prayers for Darren Wilson and his family! We cannot let this good white man be lynched!

…!!?

Y’all are just straight up disrespectful

khromejio:

lovelyandbrown:

alternaterealitygame:

Everyone please send your prayers for Darren Wilson and his family! We cannot let this good white man be lynched!

…!!?

Y’all are just straight up disrespectful

bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)

postracialcomments:

The young lady that was shot in the head by a police officer is still waiting to be interviewed by the police department
Ferguson Police claimed that 4 to 5 Black males conducted a drive by which resulted in a White woman being shot in the head. (Here, Here, Here)
(they’ve edited the articles to take out the white part and that she was killed hehehe)
Residents knew it was BS. 
Turns out Mya was shot by a police officer. The department forced surgeons to take the bullet out and took the bullet for “Ballistics”
Over a week later, she still has yet to be contacted by the department
Do not let her story go ignored

postracialcomments:

The young lady that was shot in the head by a police officer is still waiting to be interviewed by the police department

Ferguson Police claimed that 4 to 5 Black males conducted a drive by which resulted in a White woman being shot in the head. (Here, Here, Here)

(they’ve edited the articles to take out the white part and that she was killed hehehe)

Residents knew it was BS. 

Turns out Mya was shot by a police officer. The department forced surgeons to take the bullet out and took the bullet for “Ballistics”

Over a week later, she still has yet to be contacted by the department

Do not let her story go ignored

nitanahkohe:

Tina Fontaine, 15, was reported missing on Aug. 9. Her body was found in the Red River near the Alexander Docks at about 1:30 p.m., more than a week after she was reported missing. Fontaine, of Sagkeeng First Nation, had only been in Winnipeg for a month before her disappearance. “She’s a petite little thing — just turned 15, barely in the city for a little over a month,” O’Donovan said. “And she’s definitely been exploited and taken advantage of and murdered.” 
Fontaine was in the care of a Child and Family Services agency when she went missing, according to police. She had run away from her foster home before, including once in July of this year. Police said she was found wrapped in a bag, in “a condition she couldn’t have put herself in.”
“She’s a child. This is a child that has been murdered … Society should be horrified,” O’Donovan said. “That’s why we’re asking for people to come forward. And that’s why we’re asking for people to help us and to come forward with anything they know about this child.” Anyone with information can contact police at 204-986-6508 or Crime Stoppers at 204-786-8477.

nitanahkohe:

Tina Fontaine, 15, was reported missing on Aug. 9. Her body was found in the Red River near the Alexander Docks at about 1:30 p.m., more than a week after she was reported missing. Fontaine, of Sagkeeng First Nation, had only been in Winnipeg for a month before her disappearance. “She’s a petite little thing — just turned 15, barely in the city for a little over a month,” O’Donovan said. “And she’s definitely been exploited and taken advantage of and murdered.” 

Fontaine was in the care of a Child and Family Services agency when she went missing, according to police. She had run away from her foster home before, including once in July of this year. Police said she was found wrapped in a bag, in “a condition she couldn’t have put herself in.”

“She’s a child. This is a child that has been murdered … Society should be horrified,” O’Donovan said. “That’s why we’re asking for people to come forward. And that’s why we’re asking for people to help us and to come forward with anything they know about this child.” Anyone with information can contact police at 204-986-6508 or Crime Stoppers at 204-786-8477.

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 
Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 

Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot

Chromophobia is marked, not just by the desire to eradicate color, but also to control and to master its forces. When we do use color, there’s some sense that it needs to be controlled; that there are rules to its use, either in terms of its quantity or its symbolic applications (e.g., don’t paint your dining room blue because it suppresses appetite). Please note that I’m not arguing against color psychology; it’s undeniable that certain colors carry certain cultural assumptions and associations, a fact that has led anthropologist Michael Taussig to argue that color should be considered a manifestation of the sacred. But what I am arguing is that there is a pervasive idea that color gets us in the gut: it’s seductive, emotional, compelling. Color, in the words of nineteenth-century art theorist Charles Blanc, often “turns the mind from its course, changes the sentiment, swallows the thought.”

According to some art critics, sensory anthropologists, and historians, this mutual attraction and repulsion to color has centuries-old roots, bound up in a colonial past and fears of the unknown. Michael Taussig has recounted that from the seventeenth century, the British East India Company centered much of its trade on brightly colored, cheap, and dye-fast cotton textiles imported from India. Because of the Calico Acts of 1700 and 1720, which supported the interests of the wool and silk weaving guilds, these textiles could only be imported into England with the proviso that they were destined for export again, generally to the English colonies in the Caribbean or Africa. These vibrant textiles played a key part in the African trade, and especially in the African slave trade, where British traders would use the textiles to purchase slaves. According to Michael Taussig, these trades are significant not only because they linked chromophilic areas like India and Africa, but also because “color achieved greater conquests than European-instigated violence during the preceding four centuries of the slave trade. The first European slavers, the Portuguese in the fifteenth century, quickly learned that to get slaves they had to trade for slaves with African chiefs and kings, not kidnap them, and they conducted this trade with colored fabrics in lieu of violence.” Ironically, many of these slaves were then put to work in the colonies cultivating plants like indigo, that yielded dyes whose monetary values sometimes surpassed that of sugar.

In England, contemporaries often called the Indian textiles “rags” or “trash” and scorned their bright colors, and in Europe more generally, bright colors were taken as a sign of degeneracy and inferiority. The German writer Goethe famously stated that “Men in a state of nature, uncivilized nations and children, have a great fondness for colors in their utmost brightness,” whereas “people of refinement” avoid vivid colors (or what he called “pathological colors”). In short, a love of bright color marked one as uncivilized, as not possessing taste, as being “foreign” or other. Color represented the “mythical savage state out of which civilization, the nobility of the human spirit, slowly, heroically, has lifted itself — but back into which it could always slide” (Batchelor, 23).

This danger of descent, of falling into degeneracy, disorientation, and excess, resulted in a valorization of the “generalized white” mentioned above. According to Batchelor, prejudice against color “masks a fear: a fear of contamination and corruption by something that is unknown or appears unknowable,” and the highly minimal, white spaces of contemporary architecture mark an attempt to rationalize and strictly limit an interior, to stop its merging with the world outside. The “hollow, whited chamber, scraped clean, cleared of any evidence of the grotesque embarrassments of an actual life. No smells, no noises, no colour; no changing from one state to another and the uncertainty that comes with it.”

Color, Chromophobia, and Colonialism: Some Historical Thoughts | Apartment Therapy 

All of this is not to say that if you love white and abhor the thought of a red, pink, or yellow room, that you are fearful of difference. Nor do these arguments even mean that you shouldn’t have an all-white home. What I think they do show us, though, is that some of our cultural preferences have deep-seated histories, associations, and legacies. The very idea of “good taste,” as opposed to the “garishness” and “tackiness” of colors that we say hurt our eyes or that we find offensive, draws on a deep well of cultural assumptions of what is “normal” or “refined.” Knowing this, I doubt that I will go paint my bedroom a vibrant red, but I very well may rethink my gut reactions to rooms that initially take me aback.

(via pbnpineapples)

Good read.

(via blackmantagirl)

Disparate Youth by Santigold from the album: Master of My Make-Believe

gharaajapardesi:

santigold / disparate youth

While toy libraries target younger children, libraries that offer video games draw teens. A librarian at the Houston Public Library tells NPR that offering game consoles and iPads “results in a 15% to 20% increase in the circulation of books.” The games themselves also seem to help struggling readers, with some reading text in video game format “that was up to eight grades above their reading level,” says Constance Steinkuehler, an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin.
Having gaming available at libraries has other advantages as well. It gives lower-income youth the chance to play games they may not be able to afford; offers teenagers a safe place; and helps teens understand that the library is a place where they can belong.
Democracy has become Empire’s euphemism for neo-liberal capitalism.
Arundhati Roy, An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire (via khilaaf)
People who shut their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction, and anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead turns himself into a monster.
Notes From A Native Son, James Baldwin. (via the-library-and-step-on-it)

substancesauce:

slimthestoner:

sonofsam75:

Regina King

King began her acting career in 1985 playing the role of Brenda Jenkins on the television series 227,[4] a role she played until the show ended in 1990. She went on to appear in the John Singleton films Boyz n the HoodPoetic Justice and Higher Learning. In 1995, she was featured in the hit comedy film Friday. In 1996, she gained fame starring in the blockbuster romantic comedy film Jerry Maguire as Marcee Tidwell, the wife of Cuba Gooding, Jr.'s character.

She played Will Smith's wife in Enemy of the State, and was also featured in How Stella Got Her Groove BackMighty Joe Young,Down to EarthDaddy Day CareLegally Blonde 2: Red, White & BlondeA Cinderella StoryRay and Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous. Most recently, she appeared inseason 6 of the hit show 24 and the film This Christmas. In 2008, she appeared in Living Proof. She starred in the TNT police drama Southland until the show’s cancellation.

she’s also the voice of Riley and Huey Freeman on The Boondocks. she’s awesome.

Love her

gradientlair:

obiwanskenobi:

If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones. (quote)

 *slow clap….*

kateceratops:

People are giving Wilson money to thank him for killing an unarmed black teenager. Please report this to GoFundMe, as it violates their Terms of Service and they get 5% of the tens of thousands of dollars being donated. Click to report.
This is my message, in case you want to copy and paste:
Your Terms of Service prohibit “items that promote… hate, racial intolerance, or the financial exploitation of a crime.” Take a look at the comments that come with the donations on this page and tell me that doesn’t violate your terms. “Support Officer Wilson” is a thin veil for people rewarding Wilson for killing a black kid.

kateceratops:

People are giving Wilson money to thank him for killing an unarmed black teenager. Please report this to GoFundMe, as it violates their Terms of Service and they get 5% of the tens of thousands of dollars being donated. Click to report.

This is my message, in case you want to copy and paste:

Your Terms of Service prohibit “items that promote… hate, racial intolerance, or the financial exploitation of a crime.” Take a look at the comments that come with the donations on this page and tell me that doesn’t violate your terms. “Support Officer Wilson” is a thin veil for people rewarding Wilson for killing a black kid.